Events


    Eighteenth-Century Reading Room Guest Speaker Series

    You are invited to the Library’s first lecture event of the year where Prof. Sinkwan Cheng will discuss “Internationalism versus Globalization, or, Political Modernity versus Political Post-Modernity.

    Date: Wednesday, September 17th
    Time: 3 – 4 pm
    Place: (18th Century) Reading Room C196.05

    Prof. Cheng will use Kant’s political philosophy to argue against globalization. Globalization and the transformation of all states into a Grand United States are anything but compatible with Kantian cosmopolitanism. World peace as envisioned by Kant meant the peaceful coexistence of multiple free nations and not the domination of the world by one state. To elaborate on Kant’s argument, Prof. Cheng will analyze the differences between nation and empire and will also contrast the relations between nation and state in political modernity to those in political post-modernity.

    RSVP: mkent@gc.cuny.edu or call 212-817-7267.

    Unless otherwise noted, these meetings take place in Room C196.05 in the Mina Rees Library of the Graduate Center at 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York.

    Seating is limited for these talks. Please RSVP as soon as possible.

    Previous lectures in this series have included:

  • Thursday February 7, 2008, 6 PM: Dr. Barbara Naddeo (The City College Of New York of the City University of New York) — “The Crisis of Cosmopolitanism: Vico and the Making of Social Science” — RSVP to cfuchs@gc.cuny.edu or call 212.817.7085
  • Friday March 28, 2008, 2:00 PM: Dr. Raymond Erickson (Queens College, CUNY) — “In Defense of the Jews: Leipzig Theologians and the Early Enlightenment” — RSVP to cfuchs@gc.cuny.edu or call 212.817.7085
  • Friday April 11, 2008, 2:00 PM: Dr. Phil Papas (Union County College) — “These Difficulties and Distresses A Thousand Times Greater: General Charles Lee and the Suppression of the Loyalists in New York and Virginia” — RSVP to cfuchs@gc.cuny.edu or call 212.817.7085

All Guest Speaker Series events take place in Room C196.05 in the Mina Rees Library of the Graduate Center at 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York.

Seating is limited for these talks. Please RSVP as soon as possible.

___________________________________

New York Premier of Frances Burney’s comedy “The Whitlings”

(From the Magis Theatre Company’s press release): “Why has it taken 229 years for this comedy to open in New York? From its genesis, Frances Burney’s scathingly funny satire of the foibles fo the “Enlightened” met with opposition and censorship from the status-quo, including her own father! Despite pleas from the artistic community for it to be produced, both Frances and her play were just too provoking. Those human quirks and blemishes so laughably exposed by ‘a sister of the Order’ over two hundred years ago are just as dangerously ensconced in today’s society as they were in late 18th Century England. Magis actores join with director Deborah Phillips to bring this neglected gem to light. Playing at the West End Theatre (86th Street and West End Avenue) May 16 through June 1st. Please see www.magistheatre.org for details”

___________________________________

    Eighteenth-Century Interdisciplinary Group Meetings

Unless otherwise noted, these meetings take place in Room C196.05 in the Mina Rees Library of the Graduate Center at 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York.

Seating is limited for these talks. Please RSVP as soon as possible.

  • Friday May 9, 2008, 2:00 PM: Matthew J. Williams, Eighteenth-Century Reading Room Fellow — “‘Subjects, Tales, Stories, and Characters of Invention, after the Manner of Lucian, who Copied from Varro:’ Delarivier Manley, Menippean Satire, and the Rise of the Novel” — RSVP to carrieshanafelt@gmail.com or call 212.817.7085
  • ___________________________________

    Columbia University Seminars:

    Eighteenth-Century European Culture

    The Seminar meets monthly during the academic year and offers speakers an opportunity to present work in progress on various aspects of eighteenth-century European culture. The scholarly disciplines represented have included history, law, literature and language, philosophy, political science, music, and art.

    The Seminar’s meetings in 2007-2008 will be devoted to the origins of the modern concept of free speech, both conceptually (e.g., what is the relationship between free speech and the period or idea of “the Enlightenment”?) and contextually (what conditions promoted its institutionalization?). The schedule of talks listed below demonstrates the “global” nature of the discourse on free speech in the eighteenth century. All of the talks will begin at 6:00 p.m. and take place on the Columbia University campus. Please contact the chair or the rapporteur concerning location.

    For specific information about these seminars at Columbia Unviversity, visit their website at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/seminars/seminars/history/seminar-folder/eighteenth-cent-euro-culture.html

    ___________________________________

    Are you interested in doing a talk in the Eighteenth-Century Reading Room as a guest speaker on a topic related to the 18th century? Contact us at 212.817.7267 or email mkent@gc.cuny.edu

    _______________________________________

    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s